Frequently Asked Questions

1.   HOW OFTEN WOULD I USE THE VLED LIGHT?

The typical use is one (1) hour per day. This is the minimum level of treatment and should be done each day for maximum results.

2.   IS THERE A DANGER TO THE EYES?

No danger to the eye with the proper sized bulb.  The VLED is programed prior to shipping.

3.   HOW FAR SHOULD THE LIGHT BE FROM THE EYES OF THOSE BEING TREATED?

The light should not be any closer that 4 ft.   Keep a regular light on in the room, this will avoid causing eye strain. The room should not be totally dark when using the VLED device.  The user should not experience any discomfort while using.

4.   ARE THERE ANY SIDE EFFECTS?

Due to the non-invasive nature of the treatment, no side effects have been observed in any patients. All have reported positive effects and major improvements in their quality of life.

5.  IS THE DEVICE FDA APPROVED?

The FDA has issued an exemption for the device.

6.  DOES IT WORK ON OTHER DISORDERS?

Early indications are very promising. Several disorders involving the CNS are being evaluated with significant improvement. Some that are currently under study with positive effects include, but are not limited to:
  • Dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s
  • Migraine headaches
  • Epilepsy
  • PTSD
  • Myotonic dystrophy
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • ALS and PSP
  • Amyloidosis of the brain
  • Stroke, Paralysis
  • ADD, ADHD, Autism
  • Head trauma
  • Narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome
  • Restless sleep disorders


7.  HOW BIG OF A PROBLEM IS DEMENTIA?

The numbers and statistics surrounding dementia are staggering. Worldwide, there are now an estimated 24 million people living with some form of dementia.  5.5 Million in the US alone. Without a major-medical breakthrough in the fight against dementia, this number will jump to as many as 84 million who have age-related memory loss by the year 2040.
A look at the facts and statistics surrounding dementia clearly show that it is a massive issue, possibly a medical catastrophe in the making, with no easy solution.


8.  WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON DIAGNOSIS OF DEMENTIA?

Although there are several forms of dementia, Alzheimer's is the most common, and most well-known, of the age-related memory loss diseases. Currently, more than five million Americans suffer from Alzheimer's, and it is the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. About 13% of Americans over the age of 65 have Alzheimer's and half of those over age 85 will develop Alzheimer's - or a closely related dementia.  Health analysts estimate that in just five years the number of Americans with Alzheimer's will jump to 7.7 million and by 2050 the number is projected to more than double to 16 million.

9.  SO WHY IS THIS DISEASE GROWING SO RAPIDLY?

Simply put, our population is "graying" and our citizens are living much longer than any previous generation. In fact, the fastest growing segment of our population is the over 80 age group, and the odds of becoming demented for the very elderly are much higher.

Another aspect to our changing population is how quickly this change has taken place. A person born in 1900 could reasonably hope to reach about the age of 50 - the average life expectancy was just 47 years. However, over the course of the last century a number of factors, such as medical advances, widespread access to health care, improved sanitation and better nutrition have had a tremendous impact on how long we live. Consequently, the average life expectancy for both men and women in the U.S. today is 77 years of age. That's an incredible increase of 30 years in just one century.

There are about 77 million in the baby boomer generation. By the year 2030, these men and women will make up approximately 20% of the total U.S. population. As a result, health experts currently estimate that at least 10 million Baby Boomers will develop Alzheimer's.

10.  WHY DO MORE WOMEN THAN MEN GET ALZHEIMER’S?

The news for older Baby Boomer females is even bleaker as about one-in-six females over the age of 55 could develop Alzheimer's. It's not anything genetic. It is simply that women traditionally live longer (by about five years in the U.S), so it becomes basically a numbers game.

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